An analysis of the research project on women who received services from any of the 10 shelters in at

benefits of domestic violence programs

Methods In two multi-centre randomised controlled trials we investigate whether CTI, a time-limited nine month outreach intervention, is more effective than care-as-usual for abused women and homeless people making the transition from shelter facilities to supported or independent housing.

Furthermore, IPV can result in several psychological problems, such as depression [ 24 ], post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD [ 25 ] and substance abuse [ 26 ].

Furthermore, IPV can result in several psychological problems, such as depression [ 24 ], post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD [ 25 ] and substance abuse [ 26 ]. Furthermore, women experience a higher quality of life and are more satisfied with their social support due to post-shelter interventions [ 39 , 40 ]. Frequently, IPV also leads to significant social isolation [ 27 ]. A social support intervention may also be administered, such as providing information on resources to women and an environment to chat with a counsellor or friends. Results: Ten original studies, including a total number of female IPV victims, were analysed. Methods In two multi-centre randomised controlled trials we investigate whether CTI, a time-limited nine month outreach intervention, is more effective than care-as-usual for abused women and homeless people making the transition from shelter facilities to supported or independent housing. Trial registration NTR and NTR Background Although abused women and homeless people leaving shelters represent different subgroups of vulnerable people in society, they share a crucial similarity: during the critical period of transition from shelter to community living they are both at a substantially increased risk for recurrence of the adverse events which brought them to the shelters in the first place [ 1 , 2 ].

In five studies, the intervention was carried out during shelter residence; 823242728 the other five examined post-shelter interventions. As an indicator of heterogeneity, we calculated the I2-statistic.

Power calculation Because we expected only a limited number of studies, we conducted a power calculation, according to the procedures described by Borenstein and colleagues, 22 to examine how many studies would have to be included in order to have sufficient statistical power to identify relevant effects.

A total of 86 articles matched the inclusion criteria and were retrieved in full length for further review.

needs of domestic violence victims

To overcome the problems of long shelter stays and readmission to shelters, community-based programs have received more attention in recent years [ 750 ]. CTI is being applied and tested in the United States, the United Kingdom and Brazil [ 4 ] and has been investigated among a range of populations, such as men and women after discharge from inpatient psychiatric treatment [ 1112 ] and people being released from prison [ 1314 ].

Family post-shelter interventions consisting of instrumental and emotional support and teaching mothers child management skills were also evaluated and show promising results [ 4142 ].

Control groups received care-as-usual services typically provided at the same setting or with minimal additions. The present studies examine whether a time-limited outreach intervention, critical time intervention CTI [ 10 ], is more effective than care-as-usual for abused women and homeless people who are making the transition from a shelter facility to supported or independent housing in The Netherlands. Effect sizes were calculated by subtracting the post-treatment mean score of the intervention group from the mean score of the control group, and dividing the result by the pooled standard deviations of the two groups. Examples of frequently experienced adverse physical health consequences are severe injuries [ 20 ], chronic pain [ 21 ], gastro-intestinal problems [ 22 ] and gynaecological problems [ 23 ]. In addition, physical complaints [ 45 ] and mental disorders [ 46 ] are more prevalent among homeless people than among the general population. The Supplementary Data displays the results of the systematic search. To our knowledge, there is no research available on the effectiveness of CTI concerning abused women. Methods In two multi-centre randomised controlled trials we investigate whether CTI, a time-limited nine month outreach intervention, is more effective than care-as-usual for abused women and homeless people making the transition from shelter facilities to supported or independent housing. For continuous variables, we used meta-regression analyses to test whether there was a significant relationship between the continuous variable and the effect size, as indicated with a Z-value and an associated P-value. CTI, on the other hand, seems to be applicable in a variety of settings serving homeless populations with less severe problems, due to its practical and time-limited nature [ 4 ]. Nevertheless, as Jonker et al. Discussion Based on international research CTI is expected to be an appropriate intervention for clients making the transition from institutional to community living. Original research articles evaluating the effects of interventions provided to IPV victims during and after shelter residence were identified. Victims often experience an accumulation of problems related to violence, poverty and social exclusion, which has numerous negative consequences for their health. In studies that included more than one post-intervention assessment, data from the first measurement were taken.
Rated 5/10 based on 3 review
Download